Weekend theme.

Side’s been gone for a good while. But now she’s back, and the weekend theme has started again.

This week it’s Family Heirlooms. Go here to see more entries.

 

I love old stuff.

Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to walk around in an old home that’s been transformed into a museum. To see how things were so many years ago. Old music never fails to make me miss times I was never part of. The fashions of the ’30’s and ’40’s still looks good to me. When men dressed as men and women as ladies. With gloves and stockings Β and high heels.

Seeing as I love old stuff so much, I’ve made it a point to surround myself with things that reminds me of bygone days.

Some I bought on my travels – have an antique samovar here that I got in Istanbul.

Most though come from my grandparents and my dad.

I have a Bible here in Dutch, printed in 1894. A printing of “The Wooing of the Waterwitch” dating back to 1881. The Girl’s best book. Also very old. A printing of a Balzak book – 1934. An old flat toaster that my father picked up on the rubbish heap – can you believe it!! Given to somebody as a wedding present in 1934. And it still works brilliantly!

I restored my gran’s old kitchen table and a cabinet that stood in a shed for many years, a nesting place for mice and all manner of creatures. Took me 2 weeks but I made it look beautiful again. The inside actually still smells old – even after all these years. My gran’s old tins. Salt and pepper shakers. Old pen holders, pens. Rulers, a tin opener, a nutcracker.

An old Remington Typewriter. A really ancient telephone. A bunch of old fashioned camera’s.

I have many old things here. I doubt that any of them are really heirlooms. Probably not worth much in the greater scheme of things, meaning money.

To me though, their worth is more than money. They are a reminder of the people that came before me. A view into their lives. A way to connect my aimless existence to theirs in a manner of speaking. When things were built to last, and people actually greeted one another more often than not. When manners were first and foremost. they are my memories of the people that gave me life. And I might not always like the one I have, but looking at their stuff tells me that I have a reason for being here – even if only to hoard their old things πŸ˜‰

IMG_1396

This tin – my grand mom always kept her tea in it – is the single biggest reminder I have of her. A whole ritual making tea from this tin. always loose leaves, never bags. Β 


IMG_1397

 

This necklace is also from her. I don’t wear it – would be too sad if it got lost, but every so often, I’ll take it out and just watch the light bring the colour in the stones to life.

showcase 2

 

One side of the showcase I have. Filled with all manner of things. Even a pencil sharpener πŸ˜‰ I have no idea where my mom got that little orange cup, but it was used to pour rice into the pot. Nothing else, just the rice, for as long as I can remember.

sideboard

 

The sideboard I restored. Is a bit emptier now than when the picture was taken, and it’s still a prized possession.
telefoon

The telephone I was talking about. Very dusty, I know. But you get the idea of how old it really is – covered with the dust of ages so to speak!!

 

And here’s a piece of music to accompany you on your trip down my memory lane…

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25 comments on “Weekend theme.

    • What a question!!
      Just adore Mr Armstrong in his many guises πŸ˜‰
      thanks for the visit – glad you enjoyed viewing some of my treasures with me πŸ˜‰

  1. Great Post, Ghia… I can relate so well..!
    One of the great things about Ballroom Dancing Comps is that I get to ‘really’ get all dressed up in beautiful flowing gowns with gorgeous shoes, full make-up, hair coiffed, etc. The men are dressed in ‘tails’ with bow-ties and looking immaculate… Ahhhh, can’t wait for the first one in March…!
    So yes, I can relate. Old music takes me to a place I’ve never been in reality; memories of a wispy nature come near when I think upon the old fuel stove my grandmother used… I could go on forever. But hey; here I am in the 21st century trying to be as present with the new as I am ‘comfortable’ with the old….!

    • I’ve been to a few dancing comps. Can’t say I’ve ever seen any of the men in actual tails – would that not be just lovely!!
      I suppose we have to try and be as present in the present as we can, no matter how much the old means to us πŸ˜‰

  2. Great post. The heirlooms (in my view) need to have sentimental value, like your tea tin. The memories of people using them keeps the connection still alive.

    Ps why dont you wear the necklace at home when you have friends or family to visit? Then it gets loved and used and is safe at home.

    • There’s nothing like it Col. Not a single thing. To look at this beautiful piece of furniture and to remember it covered with paint and dust – It’s just marvelous πŸ˜‰
      As for my collection – it’s actually growing. Not with leaps and bounds, but people already know I’m always in the market for anything old πŸ˜‰

  3. That’s some collection you seem to have. We don’t have anything like that at home, just a whole bunch of junk, proper junk that has no meaning attached to it at all

    • Then it’s the perfect time for you to start collecting something worth keeping chickpea.
      Then again, not everybody likes all these things, and that’s also good.
      One thing that has meaning for you is more than enough πŸ˜‰

  4. When we were young we didn’t appreciate anything. Having raised families and experienced life, we’ve learned to look beneath the surface and realized how precious most things are. At least that’s how it’s been for me.

    • I like the old things I’ve surrounded myself with Tess. They give me a feeling of continuity. That, maybe, by looking at these things, the people that come after me won’t forget me as I did not forget the people that used those things.

  5. J-Ghia, a lovely post. I too love the connection between those before me and maybe the ones coming after. Nice job on the restoration! I have a few pieces I rescued and treasure ’em for all the hot sweat and labor I put into them. I’ve got an easy chair and an ottoman I kept after my Mom passed – and I can hear her saying, “Oh, for Pete’s sake, let it go!” Grin.

    • My mom is also forever carrying on about all the stuff I have, but even she knows that if one of her friends wants to get rid of anything really old, it will always be welcome at my spot πŸ˜‰
      Restoring old furniture is such a rewarding thing – just wish I could do it properly. As it is, I just fiddle around, and even though it looks good, it never looks professional, but hey. I did it myself, with my own hands, anybody has anything to say, so be it πŸ˜‰

  6. I can say that I have been in her house, she has this old table standing in the middle of the dining room, with different chairs all around (that is, if I could remember correctly) with various marks on the top and whatnot, showing me good years of abundant use. It’s just great that people can care for their stuff and use it without the influence of having the best when life is clearly NOT about material things, and love it all the same. I would sit around that table for hours on end if ever given a chance again!! πŸ˜‰

    • it is a beauty, thanks AD πŸ˜‰
      I know you’ll be horrified if you ever come to my house, but I like my clutter – it surrounds me, and I’ve grown accustomed to it πŸ™‚

  7. Great post…

    just wondering if the restored sideboard / cabinet is on its side in the photo in honour of Sidey? πŸ™‚

    • Thanks πŸ˜‰
      and I’ll go with that explanation πŸ˜‰
      For some reason, if the pic is saved like that on the HDD, even if I turn it right side up, it insists on defaulting to the original file – have no idea why!!
      Thanks for the read and the visit!!

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